March 10, 2015

Artstor Update - March 2015





March is Women's History Month, and the Artstor Digital Library offers a variety of excellent resources to support Women's Studies, from historical photographs to masterpieces by women artists. Here is a short list of our favourite blog posts about women:



Now available: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Ben Shahn | Untitled (Four Men, One Playing a Guitar) | ca. 1930s
Ben Shahn | Untitled (Four Men, One Playing a Guitar) | ca. 1930s | Art © Estate of Ben Shahn/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. This work of art is protected by copyright and/or related rights and may not be reproduced in any manner, except as permitted under the ARTstor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use, without the prior express written authorization of VAGA, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2820, New York, NY 10118. Tel.: 212-736-6666, fax: 212-736-6767, email: info@vagarights.com.
Artstor and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) are now sharing more than 300 additional images of modern and contemporary art in the Digital Library. The 1,300 images now available in Artstor consist of highlights from the museum’s permanent collection of modern and contemporary art.
International in scope, SFMOMA‘s permanent collection includes more than 26,000 works of painting, sculpture, photography, architecture and design, and media arts from 1900 to the present. Artists represented include: Robert Arneson, Robert Bechtle, Elmer Bischoff, Louise Bourgeois, Joan Brown, Jay DeFeo, Richard Diebenkorn, Dan Flavin, Sam Francis, Philip Guston, Sargent Johnson, Ellsworth Kelly, Dorothea Lange, Sol LeWitt, Nathan Oliveira, David Park, Robert Rauschenberg, Doris Salcedo, Richard Serra, Clyfford Still, Wayne Thiebaud, and Edward Weston, among others.
Jamini Roy, Queen on Horseback. University of Florida: Harn Museum of Art
Jamini Roy, Queen on Horseback. University of Florida: Harn Museum of Art
Artstor and the University of Florida are now sharing more than 700 images from the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art in the Digital Library.
The images are a selection of artworks representing the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art’s five core collecting areas: African art, Asian art, modern art, contemporary art, and photography, as well as its holdings of Ancient American art, Oceanic art, and Prints and Drawings before 1850.
As an integral part of the University of Florida, the museum advances teaching and research and serves as a catalyst for creative engagement between the university and diverse local, state, national and international audiences. Continue Reading »
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery have collaborated to release 20 images of works by contemporary artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.
Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.
Pindell was a founding member of feminist art collective AIR Galleries in 1972, and her art has been exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem, Walker Art Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Pindell’s work is included in the permanent collections of MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Yale University Art Museum. Continue Reading »
Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA
Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA
Artstor and Bob Schalkwijk have just released more than 2,100 images selected from the photographer’s archives of pre-Columbian, colonial, and 19th- and 20th-century art from Mexico in the Digital Library. The collection in Artstor focuses on murals by renowned artists such as Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco, as well as more than 50 artworks by Frida Kahlo. This is the first release of an anticipated total of 3,000 images.
An accomplished anthropological photographer, Bob Schalkwijk began his career in 1960 in Mexico. In addition to his photography of Mexican art, Schalkwijk’s work documents indigenous traditions, culinary customs, sculptures, arts and crafts, and local dress. He has traveled throughout four continents and most of Mexico focusing on people, their environment, and their culture. His archives of more than 400,000 photographs range from portraits to landscapes throughout the world.
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and Bryn Mawr College are collaborating to release nearly 1,000 photographs in the Digital Library by Richard S. Ellis of buildings and archaeological sites in Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Greece, Egypt, and Sudan. The images will also be available through the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP).
Richard S. Ellis, Professor Emeritus of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, taught at Bryn Mawr College from 1973 to 2004. He is the author of a book, Foundation Deposits in Ancient Mesopotamia, and numerous articles on the art and archaeology of Mesopotamia and Turkey. He directed the Bryn Mawr College excavations at Gritille on the Euphrates in Turkey, a site which ranged from the Neolithic through Medieval periods.

The secret names of Italian Renaissance artists

Rosso Fiorentino (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo), Angel Playing a Lute, 1521, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com; (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Rosso Fiorentino (Giovanni Battista di Jacopo), Angel Playing a Lute; detail, 1521, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com; (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Have you ever wondered why you rarely see the names of the greats from the Italian Renaissance reoccur in art history?  Why do we not see more than one artist with names such as Ghirlandaio, Masaccio, or Tintoretto? It’s because a lot of these were not really names, they were nicknames! Some, like Verrocchio (“true eye”), were flattering, while others, like Guercino (“squinter”), not so much.
Here’s a list of some of the most memorable names from the Renaissance and what they really mean:

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