February 05, 2015

New from Artstor - February 2015

Sandra Rowe, Snake, 1991. Bucknell University: Artists' Books Collection
Sandra Rowe, Snake, 1991. Bucknell University: Artists’ Books Collection
Whether you consider illuminated manuscripts from the Middle Ages the beginning, or you start with William Blake’s self-published books of poetry in the 18th century, artists have been making books for centuries. But as Toni Sant recounts in his bookFranklin Furnace and the Spirit of the Avant-garde, the term “artists’ books” is fairly recent. It only appeared in 1973 as the title of an exhibition at Moore College, and it wasn’t until 1980 that the Library of Congress adopted the term in its list of established subjects.
This delay might stem from the infinite variety of forms that artists’ books take, sometimes pushing our understanding of what a book is to unexpected extremes.
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My school has Artstor, now what? Check out our quick and easy training videos and learn how to get the most out of the Artstor Digital Library!
View images in the Artstor Digital Library Learn how to view images in the Artstor Digital Library and discover the tools available in Artstor’s Image Viewer.
Register for an Artstor user account Learn how to register for an Artstor user account and get access to more advanced features of the Artstor Digital Library.
Export to PowerPoint  Learn how to easily turn your Image Groups to PowerPoint presentations. Continue Reading »
Workshop of Raphael, probably Giovanni da Udine, Cupid on a Wagon Drawn by Snails, 1516. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. ; artres.com; scalarchives.com, (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
Workshop of Raphael, probably Giovanni da Udine, Cupid on a Wagon Drawn by Snails, 1516. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. ; artres.com; scalarchives.com, (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.
“I didn’t know how to look at art,” Phil Terry, founder and CEO of Collaborative Gain, confessed to ARTnews a few years ago. “Like most people, I would walk by quickly.” As the article points out, a study in Empirical Studies of the Arts estimates that museumgoers spend an average of just 17 seconds looking at an individual painting. But with Slow Art Day, Terry might just be changing those statistics.
It all started in 2008, when Terry decided to try an experiment at an exhibit at the Jewish Museum. Instead of rushing through the show glancing at everything, he looked at just a few works, slowly. He found that he loved it.
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Bard Graduate Center are collaborating to share approximately 1,400 exhibition installation photographs in the Artstor Digital Library.
The Bard Graduate Center (BGC) is a graduate research institute of Bard College specializing in the decorative arts, design history, and material culture. The BGC opened in New York City in 1993. Its Gallery is an intimate environment for viewing exhibitions curated by the Center’s faculty, staff, students, or specialized curatorial consultants, sometimes in collaboration with renowned institutions such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, and the New-York Historical Society.
The Main Gallery annually presents two exhibitions, with related programming, centering on the decorative arts and design. Many exhibitions consider issues and ideas outside the established canons of art history. For example, the BGC has organized monographic exhibitions that examined specific architect-designers and thematic ones addressing the role of women in the history of 20th century design.Continue Reading »
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the University of Puget Sound are collaborating to release 150 images of works by the painter, activist, and writer Abby Williams Hill in the Digital Library.
Abby Williams Hill (b.1861) is best known for her commissions for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railways. Her railway works were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905, the Jamestown Tricentennial in 1907, and the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. These pieces, along with her other landscapes, offer a rich portrait of the natural landscape of the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The accompanying archive of papers and personal materials offer insight into Hill’s life and provides an example of the American experience between the Civil War and World War II.
Meissen Porcelain Factory, Figurines of Pug Dogs, Mid 18th century.  Image © Hillwood Estate, Museum and Garden
Meissen Porcelain Factory, Figurines of Pug Dogs, Mid 18th century. Image © Hillwood Estate, Museum and Garden
Artstor has released approximately 1,000 images from the Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens’ permanent collection in the Digital Library.
Marjorie Merriweather Post bought Hillwood in 1955 and renovated the property with the intention of leaving it as a museum that would inspire and educate the public. The Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens opened as a public institution in 1977, endowing the country with the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia, a distinguished 18th-century French decorative art collection, six working greenhouses boasting one of the country’s finest orchid collections, and twenty-five acres of serene landscaped gardens and natural woodlands for all to enjoy. Continue Reading »
Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Some stories we’ve been reading this week:
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery are collaborating to release 20 images of works by the artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.
Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and The University of Texas at Austin are collaborating to release more than 900 images in the Digital Library documenting two significant renovation projects of Mexican architectural landmarks: the restoration of Teposcolula’s Open Chapel’s vault, and the restoration of the Templo y Exconvento de Santo Domingo de Guzmán in Oaxaca.
The Teposcolula Open Chapel is considered one of the best examples of an ‘open chapel’ – a characteristic structure of Mexican Christian architecture. The nearby Santo Domingo church, founded by Dominican friars in the 1570s, is an impressive baroque church and adjoining convent. The expansive site, built up over 200 years, features a series of cloisters and courtyards, and a large sanctuary. Retablo paintings by Spanish master Andrés de la Concha are still visible inside the church.Continue Reading »
Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Technology recap 2014

Ellen Day Hale, 1897. The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College
Ellen Day Hale, 1897. The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College
In addition to expanding our collections, we strive to continuously improve the Artstor Digital Library and Shared Shelf, our cloud-based media management solution. Here are just some of the enhancements we made in 2014:
Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org
Some stories we’ve been reading this week:
Museums and data
  • The Association of Art Museum Directors has released an “Art Museums by the Numbers” report, and it’s full of interesting facts. For example, did you know the average art museum spends $53.17 per visitor, but collects only $7.93 in admission fees and sales?
  • Museums are now tracking how fast visitors move through the galleries and which pieces draw the greatest crowds through a new form of data mining technology: digital beacons.
  • Hopefully that information can help combat the continuing drop in arts attendance in the US that the National Endowment for the Arts is reporting.

The Top Ten Posts of 2014

We had another busy year at the Artstor Blog, with 161,000 visits in 2014. What were people clicking on? Here’s the list of the top ten most popular posts from last year:
  1. From Babylon to Berlin: The rebirth of the Ishtar Gate
  2. Finding the phenomenal women in fine art
  3. Dürer and the elusive rhino
  4. The travels and travails of the Mona Lisa
  5. The Museum of Natural History in The Catcher in the Rye
  6. Now available: Masterworks from the Berlin State Museums
  7. IFA Archaeological Project at Abydos: Shared Shelf in action
  8. Michelangelo, Raphael, and the Swiss Guard uniforms
  9. Après la Bastille: the changing fortunes of Marie Antoinette
  10. Reginald Marsh’s Coney Island
Aelbert Cuyp, The Maas at Dordrecht, 1650. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington
Aelbert Cuyp, The Maas at Dordrecht, 1650. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington
Artstor Collections Summary 2014
This past year we added more than 151,000 new images to the Artstor Digital Library from prestigious collections across a wide array of disciplines. With the support of our contributors, the Digital Library now boasts more than 1.8 million images for education and scholarship.
We are proud to be able to share collections from institutions as varied as theNational Gallery of Art in Washington, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the American Museum of Natural History, the Museum at FIT, the New York School of Interior Design.



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