May 01, 2014

Artstor Updates: May 2014




pmxArtstor and the Portland Art Museum are collaborating to share approximately 2,500 images of artworks, with a particular focus on the Museum’s premier collections of Native American and Northwest art.
Remarkable for its depth and diversity, the Museum’s permanent collection of Native American art consists of over 3,000 objects that date from pre-European contact to the present. The collection features important works created by some 200 North American cultural groups and contemporary artists, with especially strong representation of artworks from the Northwest coastal region. Anchored by the world-renowned Rasmussen Collection of Northwest Coast Art and the encyclopedic Elizabeth Cole Butler Collection, the Portland Art Museum’s collection of Native American art is the single most visited and researched aspect of the Museum’s collection.
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and Wangechi Mutu are collaborating to share all the images included in the artist’s two major museum surveys:Wangechi Mutu at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, and A Fantastic Journey, a travelling show that opened at Nasher Museum of Art.
Kenya-born artist Wangechi Mutu scrutinizes globalization by combining found materials, magazine cutouts, sculpture, and painted imagery. Mutu is best known for provocative collages that combine drawn elements and image fragments from a variety of media such as fashion magazines, ethnographic journals, and pornography to explore gender, race, war, colonialism, global consumption, and the exoticization of the black female body.
artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Amistad Research Center are collaborating to share nearly 300 images from the Center’s art collection, focusing on works by Harlem Renaissance masters from the Harmon Foundation.
The collection in Artstor will include the entirety of Jacob Lawrence’s The Life of Toussaint L’Ouverture, the artist’s first historical series, as well as the work of many other important African American artists such as Romare Bearden, Hale Woodruff, Aaron Douglas, and Elizabeth Catlett.
Carter Medicine Company | Carter's Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry
Carter Medicine Company | Carter’s Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry
At the beginning of the nineteenth century the prevailing medical belief that “the more dangerous the disease, the more painful the remedy” meant that bloodletting, purging, and blistering were often prescribed. Not surprisingly, this led to the development of a market in patent medicines promising painless cure-alls. Manufacturers used advertising cards to promote a world of pleasant medical fixes with friendly graphics and reassuring claims and testimonials. The ingredients in these patent medicines might have been as harmful as the illness, but they were more tempting than the agonizing solutions offered by doctors.
Peter Carl Fabergé; Henrick Wigström, (Workmaster) | The Rose Trellis Easter Egg | 1907 | The Walters Art Museum
Peter Carl Fabergé; Henrick Wigström, (Workmaster) | The Rose Trellis Easter Egg | 1907 | The Walters Art Museum
As we get close to Easter, you’re sure to run into at least a few mentions of the renowned Fabergé eggs. And rightly so, as these decorative objects are ingenious and rich with history. But did you know there is much more to Fabergé than just eggs?
Exhibition: The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk | Exhibition on view: November 13, 2011-February 12, 2012 | Exhibition Location: Dallas Museum of Art; dma.org
Exhibition: The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk | Exhibition on view: November 13, 2011-February 12, 2012 | Exhibition Location: Dallas Museum of Art; dma.org
Since its opening in 2011 at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the haute couture and prêt-à-porter designs in “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: from the Sidewalk to the Catwalk” have been electrifying audiences in Montreal, Stockholm, Brooklyn, and Dallas—and now, London.
Designer: Jean Paul Gaultier | Two Ensembles; Group | Fall/Winter 1994-1995 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art; metmuseum.org
Designer: Jean Paul Gaultier | Two Ensembles; Group | Fall/Winter 1994-1995 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art; metmuseum.org
I had the opportunity to see the exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum this past March. I’m no fashionista, but I could certainly appreciate the craftsmanship and creativity of an absurdly talented artist. Credit is also due to the curator, Thierry-Maxime Loriot. I admittedly rarely read museum labels, but I was so impressed and eager to learn more that I read all of the wall text. All of it.
Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com
Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com
Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Saint George’s Day is celebrated on April 23. I know this because as a child I was obsessed with the world of make-believe. While my sister was collecting books on the natural sciences, I had a whole shelf devoted to children’s versions of Greek mythology, fairy tales, and folklore. The stories I loved best involved magic and monsters. To this day my mother will buy me used books if they have a dragon on the cover. And this is where Saint George comes in.
In the 13th century, Jacobus de Voragine wrote in The Golden Legend that Saint George was a Christian knight who in his travels came across a city called Silene that was being plagued by a dragon that lived in its pond. Silene’s inhabitants were forced to appease the monster by sacrificing their children. The victims were selected through a lottery system, and one day it was the king’s own daughter who drew the last lot.
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