October 01, 2013

New from ARTstor - October 2013



Caspar David Friedrich | Lone Tree (Solitary Tree; Village Landscape with Morning Lighting) | 1822 | Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin | Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz
Caspar David Friedrich | Lone Tree (Solitary Tree; Village Landscape with Morning Lighting) | 1822 | Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin | Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz
The Prussian Cultural Heritage Image Archive (Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz) and ARTstor have released more than 3,500 additional images of key works from the Berlin State Museums (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin). This release includes masterworks from such canonical artists as Albrecht Dürer, Caspar David Friedrich, Emil Nolde, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Hieronymus Bosch, Käthe Kollwitz, Lovis Corinth, Lucas Cranach the Elder, Matthias Grünewald, Max Ernst, Paul Klee, Peter Paul Rubens, and Rembrandt.
artstor_logo_rgb2ARTstor is collaborating with the Amon Carter Museum of American Art to share approximately 3,000 images in the Digital Library.
The collection will include a substantial number of works from the museum’s Artists Archives, which consist of the archival collections of eight prominent American photographers of the twentieth century: Clara Sipprell (1885-1975), Erwin E. Smith (1886-1947), Karl Struss (1886-1981), Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), Nell Dorr (1893-1988), Eliot Porter (1901-1990), Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), and Helen Post (1907-1979). These photographic collections are comprised of over 22,000 prints plus over 150,000 negatives. Other highlights to be released include Mexican War daguerreotypes and works by Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Curtis, Eadweard Muybridge, David Octavius Hill, and Southworth & Hawes.
Giotto | Saint Francis Preaching to the Birds, predella of Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmatta | c. 1295-1300 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. ; artres.com
Giotto | Saint Francis Preaching to the Birds, predella of Saint Francis of Assisi Receiving the Stigmatta | c. 1295-1300 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. ; artres.com
October 4 is generally recognized as the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi, patron of the animals, steward of nature, and author of the Canticle of the Creatures.  In a divinely ordained cosmos, Francis considered all elements – sun, moon, and stars, water and fire, and the animals – our sisters and brothers, and he is often depicted and described preaching to the birds, as in Giotto’s panel shown here, 1295-1300.  The cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York famously marks his feast day with the blessing of the animals (this year the closest Sunday falls on Oct. 6).  Thousands of creatures, from tortoises to camels, process though the nave, gather in the yard, and are blessed by clergy.  This scene is replayed throughout churches around the globe, a celebration of the beasts that surround us and enhance our lives.
Leonardo da Vinci | Lady with an Ermine | c. 1490 | Czartorysky Museum | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.comIn honor of this day, we invite you to explore the ARTstor bestiary, a virtual menagerie as diverse as the animal kingdom itself, where our pets and companions are presented with majesty and poignancy. Leonardo’s sleek, muscular and somewhat enigmatic ermine poised on the slashed sleeve of Cecilia Gallerani, the young mistress of Ludovico Sforza, communicates both the purity of the sitter and the power of Sforza, and was in fact the coveted pet of high Renaissance aristocrats, c. 1490.  In striking contrast, Milton Rogovin’s photograph of a working-class couple and their rabbit taken some 500 years later, glows with sheer pride and pleasure.
Photographer: Rubén Durán | Creole/Fantasy Influence (Carnival in Dominican Republic) | February or March circa 2009-2010 | Cotuí, Dominican Republic | Photograph © HCC Central College - Rubén Durán
Photographer: Rubén Durán | Creole/Fantasy Influence (Carnival in Dominican Republic) | February or March circa 2009-2010 | Cotuí, Dominican Republic | Photograph © HCC Central College – Rubén Durán
Rubén Durán, Senior Web & Video Developer at Houston Community College Central’s Curriculum Innovation Center, was kind enough to give us a little background on his collection of photographs of carnaval, which were recently released in the ARTstor Digital Library.
The riotous, rebellious world of carnaval came to life for me when I traveled to my native Dominican Republic to recapture some of my youth. The result is a collection of 550 images now available in the ARTstor Digital Library in collaboration with the Houston Community College Central Fine Arts Division. The vibrant colors document the oldest carnaval celebrations in the Americas and I discovered at the Caribbean crossroads, Creole, Spanish, and African cultures blending with the indigenous Taino people to create festivals unlike any others I’ve seen.
Photographer: Rubén Durán | Fantasy Influence (Carnival in Dominican Republic) | February or March circa 2009-2010 | Cotuí, Dominican Republic | Photograph © HCC Central College - Rubén Durán
Photographer: Rubén Durán | Fantasy Influence (Carnival in Dominican Republic) | February or March circa 2009-2010 | Cotuí, Dominican Republic | Photograph © HCC Central College – Rubén Durán
ARTstor and Houston Community College have collaborated to share 550 images documenting carnivals in the Dominican Republic by Rubén Durán in the Digital Library.
Durán’s photographs explore Dominican identity by documenting the yearly carnival celebrations in Santiago, Cotuí, Santo Domingo, La Vega, and La Romana that put to the fore a cultural mosaic forged by ordinary people.
Hans Holbein the Younger | Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve ('The Ambassadors') | 1533 | The National Gallery, London  | Photograph ©The National Gallery, London
Hans Holbein the Younger | Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve (‘The Ambassadors’) | 1533 | The National Gallery, London | Photograph ©The National Gallery, London
Hans Holbein the Younger’s “The Ambassadors” of 1533 memorializes Jean de Dinteville, French ambassador to England, and his friend, Georges de Selve, bishop of Lavaur, who acted on several occasions as French ambassador to the Republic of Venice, to the Pope in Rome, and to England, Germany, and Spain. The painting is well known for its anamorphic image of a skull in the foreground, but upon close perusal, the objects on the table between the two men prove just as fascinating.
The upper shelf, which is concerned with the the heavens, includes a celestial globe, a portable sundial, and various other instruments used for understanding the heavens and measuring time, while the lower shelf, which reflects the affairs of the world, holds musical instruments, a hymn book, a book of arithmetic, and a terrestrial globe. Continue Reading »

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